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Regents' Center for Early Developmental Education

Triangle Dominoes (1st Grade)

Recommended # of Players: 2 - 4
Triangle Dominoes

Triangle Dominoes give its players the chance to add 3 numbers together, as well as to add several 1- and 2-digit numbers together when calculating their final scores.  This game may also give teachers the opportunity to introduce calculators to the children, if appropriate. Players must coordinate spatial reasoning and math as they evaluate the best possible position to place their card to maximize their scores. Players must decent to look at all the possible places to play a card on the board to find the highest score possible. For example, a player may play a card that matches a 5 and only gets 6 points (a card with 5, 1, and 0), when they could have played a card that matches 2 and 2 but results in 8 points (a card with 2, 2, and 4). The teacher will be responsible for observing whether children are considering their placements based on maximizing the number of points they obtain (by adding all 3 numbers on their card), or if they just try to create a match with a higher number.

For an extra challenge, players can flip their cards face up so the other players can see their cards. This allows players to consider places they can block their opponents. 

Click the below icons to print out cards, rules and notes.

Triangle Dominoes cards

Triangle Dominoes: Cards

Triangle Dominoes rules

Triangle Dominoes: Rules

Triangle Dominoes notes

Triangle Dominoes: Notes

Standards Addressed: 

Head Start Standards

Social and Emotional Development

Social Relationships

  • Communicates with familiar adults and accepts or requests guidance.
  • Cooperates with others.
  • Develops friendships with peers.
  • Establishes secure relationships with adults.
  • Uses socially appropriate behavior with peers and adults, such as helping, sharing, and taking turns.
  • Resolves conflict with peers alone and/or with adult intervention as appropriate.
  • Recognizes and labels other's emotions.
  • Expresses empathy and sympathy to peers.
  • Recognizes how actions affect others and accepts consequences of one's actions.

Self-Concept & Self-Efficacy

  • Demonstrates age-appropriate independence in a range of activities, routines, and tasks.
  • Demonstrates age-appropriate independence in decision making regarding activities and materials.

Self-Regulation

  • Recognizes and labels emotions.
  • Handles impulses and behavior with minimal direction from adults.
  • Follows simple rules, routines, and directions.

Emotional & Behavioral Health

  • Expresses a range of emotions appropriately, such as excitement, happiness, sadness, and fear.
  • Refrains from disruptive, aggressive, angry, or defiant behaviors.
  • Adapts to new environments with appropriate emotions and behaviors.

Approaches to Learning

Initiative and Curiosity

  • Demonstrates flexibility, imagination, and inventiveness in approaching tasks and activities.
  • Demonstrates eagerness to learn about and discuss a range of topics, ideas, and tasks.
  • Asks questions and seeks new information.

Persistence & Attentiveness

  • Maintains interest in a project or activity until completed.
  • Resists distractions, maintains attention, and continues the task at hand through frustration or challenges.

Cooperation

  • Plans, initiates, and completes learning activities with peers.
  • Joins in cooperative play with others and invites others to play.
  • Models or teaches peers.
  • Helps, shares, and cooperates in a group.

Logic and Reasoning

Reasoning & Problem Solving

  • Seeks multiple solutions to a question, task, or problem.
  • Uses past knowledge to build new knowledge.

Language Development

Receptive Language

  • Attends to language during conversations, songs, stories, or other learning experiences.

Expressive Language

  • Engages in communication and conversation with others.
  • Uses language to express ideas and needs.
  • Engages in conversations with peers and adults

Literacy Knowledge and Skills

Print Concepts & Conventions

  • Recognizes print in everyday life, such as numbers, letters, one's name, words, and familiar logos and signs.
  • Understands that print conveys meaning.

Mathematics Knowledge and Skills

Number Relationships & Operations

  • Uses a range of strategies, such as counting, subitizing, or matching, to compare quantity in two sets of objects and describes the comparison with terms, such as more, less, greater than, fewer, or equal to.

Geometry and Spatial Sense

  • Understands directionality, order, and position of objects, such as up, down, in front, behind.

Patterns

  • Sorts, classifies, and serializes (puts in a pattern) objects using attributes, such as color, shape, or size.
  • Recognizes, duplicates, and extends simple patterns.

Measurement & Comparison

  • Compares objects using attributes of length, weight and size (bigger, longer, taller, heavier).

 

Common Core Standards

Kindergarten

Counting and Cardinality

Know number names and the count sequence.

  • K.CC.1. Count to 100 by ones and by tens.
  • K.CC.2. Count forward beginning from a given number within the known sequence (instead of having to begin at 1).

Count to tell the number of objects.

  • K.CC.4. Understand the relationship between numbers and quantities; connect counting to cardinality.
    • When counting objects, say the number names in the standard order, pairing each object with one and only one number name and each number name with one and only one object.
    • Understand that the last number name said tells the number of objects counted. The number of objects is the same regardless of their arrangement or the order in which they were counted.
    • Understand that each successive number name refers to a quantity that is one larger.
  • K.CC.5. Count to answer "how many?" questions about as many as 20 things arranged in a line, a rectangular array, or a circle, or as many as 10 things in a scattered configuration; given a number from 1to 20, count out that many objects.

Compare numbers

  • K.CC.6. Identify whether the number of objects in one group is greater than, less than, or equal to the number of objects in another group, e.g., by using matching and counting strategies.
  • K.CC.7. Compare two numbers between 1 and 10 presented as written numerals.

Operations and Algebraic Thinking

Understand addition as putting together and adding to, and understand subtraction as taking apart and taking from.

  • K.OA.1. Represent addition and subtraction with objects, fingers, mental images, drawings, sounds (e.g., claps), acting out situations, verbal explanations, expressions, or equations.
  • K.OA.2. Solve addition and subtraction word problems, and add and subtract within 10, e.g., by using objects or drawings to represent the problem.
  • K.OA.3. Decompose numbers less than or equal to 10 into pairs in more than one way, e.g., by using objects or drawings, and record each decomposition by a drawing or equation (e.g., 5 = 2 + 3 and 5 = 4 + 1).
  • K.OA.5. Fluently add and subtract within 5.

Number and Operations in Base Ten

Work with numbers 11-19 to gain foundations for place value.

  • K.NBT.1. Compose and decompose numbers from 11 to 19 into ten ones and some further ones, e.g., by using objects or drawings, and record each composition or decomposition by a drawing or equation (such as 18 = 10 + 8); understand that these numbers are composed of ten ones and one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine ones.

Measurement and Data

Classify objects and count the number of objects in each category.

  • K.MD.3. Classify objects into given categories; count the numbers of objects in each category and sort the categories by count.

Geometry

Identify and describe shapes (squares, circles, triangles, rectangles, hexagons, cubes, cones, cylinders, and spheres).

  • K.G.1. Describe objects in the environment using names of shapes, and describe the relative positions of these objects using terms such as above, below, beside, in front of, behind, and next to.

Analyze, compare, create, and compose shapes.

  • K.G.6. Compose simple shapes to form larger shapes. For example, Can you join these two triangles with full sides touching to make a rectangle?

First Grade

Operations and Algebraic Thinking

Represent and solve problems involving addition and subtraction.

  • 1.OA.1. Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.
  • 1.OA.2. Solve word problems that call for addition of three whole numbers whose sum is less than or equal to 20, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Add and subtract within 20.

  • 1.OA.5. Relate counting to addition and subtraction (e.g., by counting on 2 to add 2).
  • 1.OA.6. Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 - 4 = 13 - 3 - 1 = 10 - 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 - 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).

Work with addition and subtraction equations.

  • 1.OA.7. Understand the meaning of the equal sign, and determine if equations involving addition and subtraction are true or false. For example, which of the following equations are true and which are false? 6 = 6, 7 = 8 - 1, 5 + 2 = 2 + 5, 4 + 1 = 5 + 2.

Number and Operations in Base Ten

Understand place value.

  • 1.NBT.2. Understand that the two digits of a two-digit number represent amounts of tens and ones. Understand the following as special cases:
    • 10 can be thought of as a bundle of ten ones called a ten.
    • The numbers from 11 to 19 are composed of a ten and one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine ones.
    • The numbers 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 refer to one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine tens (and 0 ones).

Second Grade

Operations and Algebraic Thinking

Represent and solve problems involving addition and subtraction.

  • 2.OA.1. Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Add and subtract within 20.

  • 2.OA.2. Fluently add and subtract within 20 using mental strategies.By end of Grade 2, know from memory all sums of two one-digit numbers.