down arrowMenu

Regents' Center for Early Developmental Education

Track Meet (1st Grade)

Recommended # of Players: 2
Track Meet

Track Meet gives its players the opportunity to compare two numbers to determine the greatest number rolled. The player who rolled the highest number gets to move. In this respect, the game is similar to High Card. It is a good game for children who have difficulty taking turns, or who always want to be first in a game, because they do not have to take turns to play this game.

Players are given the opportunity to reason about more and less by comparing two rolled numbers. They also engage in one-to-one correspondence as they move one space for every dot on the die. As they move around the track, players begin to see the game as a series of additions.

Click the below icons to print out game board, rules and notes.

Track Meet game board

Track Meet: Game board

Track Meet rules

Track Meet: Rules

Track Meet notes

Track Meet: Notes

Standards Addressed: 

Head Start Standards

Social and Emotional Development

Social Relationships

  • Communicates with familiar adults and accepts or requests guidance.
  • Cooperates with others.
  • Develops friendships with peers.
  • Establishes secure relationships with adults.
  • Uses socially appropriate behavior with peers and adults, such as helping, sharing, and taking turns.
  • Resolves conflict with peers alone and/or with adult intervention as appropriate.
  • Recognizes and labels other's emotions.
  • Expresses empathy and sympathy to peers.
  • Recognizes how actions affect others and accepts consequences of one's actions.

Self-Concept & Self-Efficacy

  • Demonstrates age-appropriate independence in a range of activities, routines, and tasks.
  • Demonstrates age-appropriate independence in decision making regarding activities and materials.

Self-Regulation

  • Recognizes and labels emotions.
  • Handles impulses and behavior with minimal direction from adults.
  • Follows simple rules, routines, and directions.

Emotional & Behavioral Health

  • Expresses a range of emotions appropriately, such as excitement, happiness, sadness, and fear.
  • Refrains from disruptive, aggressive, angry, or defiant behaviors.
  • Adapts to new environments with appropriate emotions and behaviors.

Approaches to Learning

Persistence & Attentiveness

  • Maintains interest in a project or activity until completed.
  • Resists distractions, maintains attention, and continues the task at hand through frustration or challenges.

Cooperation

  • Plans, initiates, and completes learning activities with peers.
  • Joins in cooperative play with others and invites others to play.
  • Models or teaches peers.
  • Helps, shares, and cooperates in a group.

Logic and Reasoning

  • Classifies, compares, and contrasts objects, events, and experiences.

Mathematics Knowledge and Skills

Number Concepts & Quantities

  • Recites numbers in the correct order and understands that numbers come “before” or “after” one another.
  • Associates quantities and the names of numbers with written numerals.
  • Uses one-to-one counting and subitizing (identifying the number of objects without counting) to determine quantity.
  • Uses the number name of the last object counted to represent the number of objects in the set.

Number Relationships & Operations

  • Uses a range of strategies, such as counting, subitizing, or matching, to compare quantity in two sets of objects and describes the comparison with terms, such as more, less, greater than, fewer, or equal to.

Measurement & Comparison

  • Compares objects using attributes of length, weight and size (bigger, longer, taller, heavier).

 

Common Core Standards

Kindergarten

Counting and Cardinality

Know number names and the count sequence.

  • K.CC.1. Count to 100 by ones and by tens.
  • K.CC.2. Count forward beginning from a given number within the known sequence (instead of having to begin at 1).

Count to tell the number of objects.

  • K.CC.4. Understand the relationship between numbers and quantities; connect counting to cardinality.
    • When counting objects, say the number names in the standard order, pairing each object with one and only one number name and each number name with one and only one object.
    • Understand that the last number name said tells the number of objects counted. The number of objects is the same regardless of their arrangement or the order in which they were counted.
    • Understand that each successive number name refers to a quantity that is one larger.
  • K.CC.5. Count to answer how many? questions about as many as 20 things arranged in a line, a rectangular array, or a circle, or as many as 10 things in a scattered configuration; given a number from 1to 20, count out that many objects.

Operations and Algebraic Thinking

Understand addition as putting together and adding to, and understand subtraction as taking apart and taking from.

  • K.OA.1. Represent addition and subtraction with objects, fingers, mental images, drawings, sounds (e.g., claps), acting out situations, verbal explanations, expressions, or equations.
  • K.OA.5. Fluently add and subtract within 5.

Geometry

Identify and describe shapes (squares, circles, triangles, rectangles, hexagons, cubes, cones, cylinders, and spheres).

  • K.G.1. Describe objects in the environment using names of shapes, and describe the relative positions of these objects using terms such as above, below, beside, in front of, behind, and next to.