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Regents' Center for Early Developmental Education

Animal Rummy (1st Grade)

Recommended # of Players: 2 - 4
Animal Rummy

Animal Rummy is a simplified version of the traditional game of rummy and is suitable for children who are just beginning to play games. Also, it is good for children who are learning the mechanics of card games (taking turns, drawing a card, discarding a card). The game also moves relatively quickly because of the small number of sets and the rule that the game ends when one player gets 2 sets.

Logic: This game gives children an opportunity to reason which player is likely to have a certain animal card. For example, if Player A asks Player B for an elephant, Player C will know that Player A has an elephant. Probability is also a key component of this game. If Player A needs a fox and knows that Player B does not have one, it is certain that Players C or D have a fox.

Perspective Taking: This game helps children develop perspective taking. Young children often do not hide their cards from other players when playing card games. This game allows children to figure out that when they can see their opponent’s cards, they can use this information to decide what card to discard. It is important to not correct children who show their cards, but to allow children to figure this out for themselves.

Click the below icons to print out cards, card backs, rules and notes.

Animal Rummy cards

Animal Rummy: Cards

Animal Rummy card backs

Animal Rummy: Card backs

Animal Rummy rules

Animal Rummy: Rules

Animal Rummy notes

Animal Rummy: Notes

Standards Addressed: 

Head Start Standards

Social relationships

  • Communicates with familiar adults and accepts or requests guidance.
  • Cooperates with others.
  • Develops friendships with peers.
  • Establishes secure relationships with adults.
  • Uses socially appropriate behavior with peers and adults, such as helping, sharing, and taking turns.
  • Resolves conflict with peers alone and/or with adult intervention as appropriate.
  • Recognizes and labels others emotions.
  • Expresses empathy and sympathy to peers.
  • Recognizes how actions affect others and accepts consequences of one's actions.

Self-concept & Self-Efficacy

  • Demonstrates age-appropriate independence in a range of activities, routines, and tasks.
  • Demonstrates age-appropriate independence in decision making regarding activities and materials.

Self-Regulation

  • Recognizes and labels emotions.
  • Handles impulses and behavior with minimal direction from adults.
  • Follows simple rules, routines, and directions.

Emotional & Behavioral Health

  • Expresses a range of emotions appropriately, such as excitement, happiness, sadness, and fear.
  • Refrains from disruptive, aggressive, angry, or defiant behaviors.
  • Adapts to new environments with appropriate emotions and behaviors.

Approaches to Learning

Initiative and Curiosity

  • Demonstrates flexibility, imagination, and inventiveness in approaching tasks and activities.
  • Asks questions and seeks new information.

Persistence & Attentiveness

  • Maintains interest in a project or activity until completed.
  • Resists distractions, maintains attention, and continues the task at hand through frustration or challenges.

Cooperation

  • Plans, initiates, and completes learning activities with peers.
  • Joins in cooperative play with others and invites others to play.
  • Models or teaches peers.
  • Helps, shares, and cooperates in a group.

Logic and Reasoning

Reasoning & Problem Solving

  • Seeks multiple solutions to a question, task, or problem.
  • Recognizes cause and effect relationships.
  • Classifies, compares, and contrasts objects, events, and experiences.
  • Uses past knowledge to build new knowledge

Language Development

Receptive Language

  • Attends to language during conversations, songs, stories, or other learning experiences.

Expressive Language

  • Engages in communication and conversation with others.
  • Uses language to express ideas and needs.
  • Engages in conversations with peers and adults

Mathematics Knowledge and Skills

Number Relationships & Operations

  • Uses a range of strategies, such as counting, subitizing, or matching, to compare quantity in two sets of objects and describes the comparison with terms, such as more, less, greater than, fewer, or equal to.
  • Recognizes that numbers (or sets of objects) can be combined or separated to make another number through the grouping of objects.
  • Identifies the new number created when numbers are combined or separated.

Patterns

  • Sorts, classifies, and serializes (puts in a pattern) objects using attributes, such as color, shape, or size.
  • Recognizes, duplicates, and extends simple patterns.

Common Core Standards

Kindergarten

Counting and Cardinality

Know number names and the count sequence.

  • K.CC.1. Count to 100 by ones and by tens.
  • K.CC.2. Count forward beginning from a given number within the known sequence (instead of having to begin at 1).

Count to tell the number of objects.

  • K.CC.4. Understand the relationship between numbers and quantities; connect counting to cardinality.
    • When counting objects, say the number names in the standard order, pairing each object with one and only one number name and each number name with one and only one object.
    • Understand that the last number name said tells the number of objects counted. The number of objects is the same regardless of their arrangement or the order in which they were counted.
    • Understand that each successive number name refers to a quantity that is one larger.
  • K.CC.5. Count to answer how many? questions about as many as 20 things arranged in a line, a rectangular array, or a circle, or as many as 10 things in a scattered configuration; given a number from 1to 20, count out that many objects.

Compare numbers

  • K.CC.6. Identify whether the number of objects in one group is greater than, less than, or equal to the number of objects in another group, e.g., by using matching and counting strategies.

Measurement and Data

Classify objects and count the number of objects in each category.

  • K.MD.3. Classify objects into given categories; count the numbers of objects in each category and sort the categories by count.